Rabid Arsenal supporter, Fencer, voracious reader.

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allthesunthatshines:

I’ve been a fan of Hidetoshi Nakata since his season with AS Roma in the early 2000s. See, behind franchise-loyal Francesco Totti the team won the Italian Serie A at a time when I was perhaps paying the most attention to soccer (read as: when I was playing competitively). Since those glory days, Nakata has been an ambassador for Japanese soccer as the country continually improves its stature. But he’s also taken on a sort of mythic status off the pitch as he seems to be one of the most fashion-conscious athletes in the world. 
Stateside, we’re inundated with 6’8” NBA players pea cocking with absurd patterns and these guys. For Nakata, the look is different. While you might not find Nakata in the archives of ACL or PTO, he should be noted as one of the globe’s better-dressed athletes. He channels a mixture of the menswear sphere: the gothdom of Alexander McQueen, the leather utopia of Undercover and the denim dreams of Kapital. He takes a little bit from a lot of brands. 

Being an athlete, it’s easier to finagle the fits that Nakata does. Measurements are surer, sizes run smaller and the look of higher fashion leans toward the fit crowd. (He was in the Calvin Klein underwear commercial during this last Super Bowl—not linking because *pause*). What I like about Nakata though, is his versatility and willingness to try things out. And not just little details. But broad, archetypal sorts of looks. 
Many times when we discuss and explore men’s style, we stick to that “uniform” mentality. Each “style icon” we write about has to adhere to his look and never depart from it. That’s usually why they’re being written about. To an extent I agree: the blazer, shirt, tie, trouser, shoes look is, of course, timeless. But can we not laud those who are able to experiment? Those who can pull of a variety of looks without ever looking out of place? To me, Nakata defines that. 
His looks range from the deep scarlet blazer with a turtleneck to baggy khakis, high tops and a denim shirt. Regardless of the exact items he’s wearing, he dons them with confidence. On a larger scale, this is what style should be. We shouldn’t have to confine ourselves to a particular “look” unless it’s the one we truly want to. I love the understated classics as much as anyone—I spend a glut of time fawning after Finamore, LBM and Church’s. But I also own slim black pants, a motorcycle jacket and few loud, patterned scarves. 

Nakata blazes trails between looks with little effort. The Tumblr-famous photo of him walking in that beaten up leather jacket with an excess of zippers and well-worn jeans has made more than its fair share of rounds on the internet. But he looks just as home there as near the runway or on the red carpet. For what it’s worth, Nakata can provide some inspiration to play around with your style, without looking like you abandoned the rest of your wardrobe in the snow. There’s always room for a little “flash in the pan” to spice things up. It’s still something I’m learning, but we should take advantage of that. 
                         

                         

allthesunthatshines:

I’ve been a fan of Hidetoshi Nakata since his season with AS Roma in the early 2000s. See, behind franchise-loyal Francesco Totti the team won the Italian Serie A at a time when I was perhaps paying the most attention to soccer (read as: when I was playing competitively). Since those glory days, Nakata has been an ambassador for Japanese soccer as the country continually improves its stature. But he’s also taken on a sort of mythic status off the pitch as he seems to be one of the most fashion-conscious athletes in the world. 

Stateside, we’re inundated with 6’8” NBA players pea cocking with absurd patterns and these guys. For Nakata, the look is different. While you might not find Nakata in the archives of ACL or PTO, he should be noted as one of the globe’s better-dressed athletes. He channels a mixture of the menswear sphere: the gothdom of Alexander McQueen, the leather utopia of Undercover and the denim dreams of Kapital. He takes a little bit from a lot of brands. 

Being an athlete, it’s easier to finagle the fits that Nakata does. Measurements are surer, sizes run smaller and the look of higher fashion leans toward the fit crowd. (He was in the Calvin Klein underwear commercial during this last Super Bowl—not linking because *pause*). What I like about Nakata though, is his versatility and willingness to try things out. And not just little details. But broad, archetypal sorts of looks. 

Many times when we discuss and explore men’s style, we stick to that “uniform” mentality. Each “style icon” we write about has to adhere to his look and never depart from it. That’s usually why they’re being written about. To an extent I agree: the blazer, shirt, tie, trouser, shoes look is, of course, timeless. But can we not laud those who are able to experiment? Those who can pull of a variety of looks without ever looking out of place? To me, Nakata defines that. 

His looks range from the deep scarlet blazer with a turtleneck to baggy khakis, high tops and a denim shirt. Regardless of the exact items he’s wearing, he dons them with confidence. On a larger scale, this is what style should be. We shouldn’t have to confine ourselves to a particular “look” unless it’s the one we truly want to. I love the understated classics as much as anyone—I spend a glut of time fawning after Finamore, LBM and Church’s. But I also own slim black pants, a motorcycle jacket and few loud, patterned scarves. 

Nakata blazes trails between looks with little effort. The Tumblr-famous photo of him walking in that beaten up leather jacket with an excess of zippers and well-worn jeans has made more than its fair share of rounds on the internet. But he looks just as home there as near the runway or on the red carpet. For what it’s worth, Nakata can provide some inspiration to play around with your style, without looking like you abandoned the rest of your wardrobe in the snow. There’s always room for a little “flash in the pan” to spice things up. It’s still something I’m learning, but we should take advantage of that. 

                         

                         

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the-absolute-best-posts:

contraband-kissing:

omg I love this so much

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gottacatchemall:

[あか と みどり]

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centurycreeper:


silentgiantla
:

A BEAUTIFUL INFOGRAPHIC OF 30 SHOTS

It always comes in handy at parties to know how to do cocktails or shots, while we already reviewed these great Cocktail infographic posters (here & here), here is another cool poster designed by Donald Bullach. This time it’s for shots! Enjoy the 30 shots recipes you can now make for your next party! and drink responsibly

I really wanna try all of these uwwaaaahhhhh

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:o

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Best one liner in the Avengers movie.

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